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Writing Advice and Which to Take

I’m sure, like me, you’ve heard all kinds of writing advice from every source you can think of. You’ve probably read books, watched YouTube videos, followed authors on Facebook or Twitter, joined a writing group, or the million other ways you’ve learned about writing.

What advice did you choose to take? Did you take all of it? Did you reject it? Did you get frustrated because you are unsure?

Man Wearing Brown Jacket and Using Grey Laptop

Well, I have been transparent about when I started seriously writing. I started writing in 2015 seriously after writing for a year off and on. I had joined Wattpad and had good readership on my stories. I got cocky and thought that if thousands of people were reading my writing, I was doing something right. Right?

Wrong.

It turns out that my story was only receiving thousands (72k, to be exact) of readers was because of the content. I started in fan fiction and used a celebrity (I won’t name who because it isn’t important) couple tag to get readers. At the time this couple was on every news stand and social media page. It was “huge” news. I wrote about them and soon got a following of fans (of the couple, not me).

I was happy that people took an interest in my writing and I did have a couple (few) readers who were interactive in giving me feedback. However, the feedback (although appreciated) was along the lines of, “omg amazing!” “I can’t wait to read the next chapter.” “Wow, you’re a great writer.” “You’re writing is so realistic, and so on.

While these comments (initially) made me feel good, I discovered something later. First, I had to take in consideration my audience. Teenage girls looking for romance with smut (I occasionally indulged). Also, I had to take in consideration that I had NEVER received comments of improvement. I had not received any comments about plot, grammar, structure, POV, or any other very important writing rules.

When I joined Twitter, I was a fresh NEW writer on the scene. I was eager to meet new people and to share my writing. After the first week, I decided to share some short poems. But, after reading fellow author projects, I quickly realized that I was in over my head. I was nervous to share my writing.

I had added people with books I’d read, admired, and wanted to grow from. Then, I added more like-minded writers. I started to get advice from all walks of life when it came to writing.

Let me tell you, my head started to spin. So, I started picking and choosing which advice to follow and how to overcome some personal obstacles in my writing journey. I’m happy to say that my writing is improving. I’m sad to say that I’m still unsure of which writing advice to take and which to dismiss.

What I will say is, I have an amazing group of writers that I follow on Twitter. The Writing Community is open and willing to help. I’ve had great people who have beta read for me on something I wrote a few years ago. I’m thankful for all of them and the advice they give. This post is not about the advice from them (though appreciated greatly).

Tell me, what writing advice (aside from social media) have you received and which have you chosen to follow? Why?

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